Arber & Son Editions, Marfa TX

Back in March 2015, I toured Marfa, TX, visiting the Chinati Foundation, McDonald Observatory, numerous galleries and amazing coffee places, and sleeping under the stars at El Cosmico. I also had the opportunity to tour Arber & Sons Editions, run by the gracious Robert Arber, Tamarind Master Printer and worked for Donal Judd as his personal printer. He renovated a beautiful old building downtown, which now serves as his home and studio. Swoon.

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Cimarron Printmakers and Raburn Studio, Amarillo, Texas

Back in January 2015, the Tamarind crew went to Cimarron Printmakers/Raburn Studios to check out what will soon become the largest multi-discipline independent print studio in the country. Michael Raburn was very generous with his time– giving us a tour of the studio in addition to a demo on his beautiful offset press. Check out the photos below!

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Ladies’ Choice at Satellite Contemporary

Ladies’ Choice: An Exhibition of Women Lithographers from the Tamarind Institute

Tamarind Printers
Judith Baumann
Danielle Blevins
Candice Malyn Corgan
Maria Erikson (Senior Printer)
Alice Gauthier
Nora Hammenberg
Amanda Mulvey
Jackie Riccio

UNM MFA and BFA Students
Sam McBride
Robbie Pino
Stefan Jennings Batista
Katelyn Bladel
Cornelia Oliver
Dvoie Inez
Bradford Thomas Erickson

As the Tamarind Institute celebrates 55 years of collaborative fine art lithography, this spring the very first class of all woman printers successfully completed the prestigious Professional Printer Training Program. This international program attracts students from around the world that wish to intensely study the fine art of lithography. Lithography, invented in 1796, is a printmaking technique reliant upon chemistry to alter the composition of a stone or aluminum plate surface in order to repel or attract ink. The versatility of mark making, coupled with the ease and immediacy in which artists translate their artistic vision to print, has cemented lithography as an alluring, highly expressive medium for centuries. However, processing and printing from stone or plate is a highly technical and nuanced endeavor, necessitating the need for collaboration between professional lithographic printers and artists. Since its founding in 1960, Tamarind’s main objectives include creating a pool of master artisan-printers in the United States by training apprentices, stimulating the artist – printer collaborative relationship in an effort to advance the expressive potential of lithography, and establishing an exceptional collection of original lithographic works of art. Those that complete the Professional Printer Training program continue their careers as professional printers, entrepreneurs, and artists. Ladies’ Choice represents both original works by these Tamarind-trained printer-artists as well as collaborative lithographic works between printer and artist, in this case select current University of New Mexico Graduate and Undergraduate Fine Art Students.

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Tamarind folks after the install: Alice, Danielle, Amanda, Candice, Jackie and Maria.

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Book by Dvoie Inez, printed by Alice Gauthier.

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Prints by Nora and Candice.

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Prints by Amanda and Robbie Pino (printed by me).

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Prints by Alice.

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Art by Bradford, printed by Candice.

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Art by Katelyn, printed by Nora (above) and my “Dead Wrestlers: Their Words” series.

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Print collaboration between Jackie and Stefan (above) and Cornelia’s book project, printed by Amanda (below).

Skyline Type Foundry

Earlier this week, I visited Skyline Type Foundry in Prescott, Arizona. Sky graciously opened his shop to me and gave a wonderful tour. The studio was humming with activity as they were busy casting type and preparing shipments for folks all over the world. He has a huge library of matrices, including decorative elements and borders. The shop is divided into “clean” and “dirty,” with his personal press and type collection located in his studio, and a huge outbuilding for casting and packing type. This is one of the very few places in the world this craft is being kept alive.
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Sitka Center Letterpress Workshop

At the end of May, I lead a letterpress broadside workshop at The Sitka Center of Art & Ecology on the coast of Oregon. I had seven wonderful students. In addition to printing little broadsides with my Vandercook poster press (hauled all the way up from New Mexico!), we created linoleum relief prints, background blends, stencils and monoprints using the resident etching press. Students also used my personal collection of photopolymer cuts. This three day workshop was incredibly fun but exhausting! All the participants were extremely happy with the prints they created.

Praise from a student:

“I just wanted to say what a tremendously wonderful experience our workshop was this weekend.  I expected it to be awesome… but it BLEW ME AWAY! Judy was great (Knowledgeable, well-prepared, encouraging, FUN!), the facilities and setting were amazing, and it was so refreshing to become part of an instantaneous team to cheer each other on. I had to stretch to think of any suggestions for workshop improvement, and my only complaint is that I now have the printmaking bug…”

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The Photographic Broadside at Pope Press Olympia

This past July, I taught a three evening workshop at Pope Press titled “The Photographic Broadside.” The description read as follows:

In this three evening, nine hour workshop, students will have the opportunity to combine digital photography with traditional typesetting and letterpress techniques. Students will create original writings responding to their photographic images. These photographs will be digitally printed on fine art rag paper. Participants will then hand set type and print writings on images, creating unique photo-based letterpress broadsides. Each
participant will leave with an edition of four photographic letterpress broadside prints!

Digital images were printed on Moab by Legion Paper with my Epson 2400. Image size of prints were 11″ x 17.” Below are some of the gorgeous prints we made!

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Cutting down broken Litho Stones

Back in June, Evergreen Faculty member, artist and all around great guy Bob Leverich and I ventured down to his secret stone cutting area to cut down several medium sized litho stones that had been broken by students over the years. We carefully measured the pieces into the largest usable shapes and sizes and spent the day slowly sawing and beveling the stones back into shape. Cutting stone is very difficult, even for relatively soft Bavarian limestone. Bob is one strong dude! I was sneezing talc from my nose for days.

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Printshop at Northern Arizona University

This past October, I was invited by friend and colleague Nicole Langille to lecture at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff about my work. The talk went well, with several thoughtful questions asked by students afterward concerning appropriation in art and the state of contemporary printmaking. I was also given a tour of NAU’s lovely, all-encompassing newly remodeled printshop, headed by professor of printmaking David Williams. The studio was beautiful, well organized and very clean. What a tight shop! Photos below:

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WSU Vancouver Install – Parts Unknown

Judith Baumann
Parts Unknown
October 18, 2013 – February 15, 2014
Gallery @ Washington State University Vancouver
Vancouver, Washington

Parts Unknown, a phrase once used professional wrestling to denote mystery and ambiguity of origin, signifies the disparate bodies of work displayed in this exhibition. The work plays with commercial printing processes, from offset photolithography and sign printing to hand drawn four-color print halftones. Ideas of classism and escapism permeate each body of work, tributes to former childhood heroes and childlike perceptions of comparative wealth, coupled with the realization that only comes from age and experience– heroes are mere men, mortal all the same, and wealth is not measured by streets of identical split level houses. The act of tiling, scaling, building and layering progressively becomes looser and more visible throughout, acknowledging the realization process and its very origin–from parts unknown– a rust belt baby, blue collar to the bone.

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WSU Vancouver letterpress demonstration

On November 15, 2013 I packed up my Vandercook 0 proof press and other assorted miscellany and drove to WSU Vancouver to give an afternoon letterpress workshop in conjunction with my exhibition on campus. I gave a short lecture about the history of the printing press as well as contemporary resources for letterpress artists. I brought along choice selections from my library and also showed a handful of personal broadside projects. Then, students got to set type, integrate photopolymer images and create their own broadsides. The workshop was incredibly fun, and I would like to thank Avantika Bawa, Harrison Higgs and Dale Strouse for hosting me and my big inky mess! The photos below were graciously taken by Dale Strouse.